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How to find a job in your profession or trade in Canada

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How to find a job in your profession or trade in Canada

Published on November 9th, 2021 at 09:49am EST Updated on November 9th, 2021 at 03:28pm EST

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Canada can be a land of new opportunities to further your profession or trade.

As a new immigrant or someone who wishes to immigrate to Canada, securing an employment offer can make your life in your new province much easier. While the job search process might be different in your native country, these tips can help you find more career openings and increase your chance of success.

Tips on finding a job in prominent sectors

There are resources available for most professions and trades in Canada, but if you are pursuing one of the following careers, these are some of the top in-demand fields in Canada now:

  • Financial Services: To build a career in retail banking or securities trading, a Canadian securities course certification can help secure a job. Interested in working at Scotiabank? Visit our career page here.
  • IT: A career in Informational Technology (IT) can span across areas like Development, Project Management and Quality Assurance. There are wide options for both short-term contracting and full time to kick start your career again.  Since tech jobs cover a wide area of specialties, so it is important to define yourself as an expert in your skills. IT careers can mean that you are specializing in areas like development, project management and quality assurance. There are many options in this field for both short-term contracting and full-time positions to kickstart your career.
  • Healthcare: Healthcare is another regulated career, and it is important to decide which province is right for you before pursuing accreditation. Provinces vary on their demand for healthcare workers and have different credential programs. Find health careers throughout Canada posted on Canada’s Health Sector Job Board.
  • Trades: There is a dire need for trades workers throughout Canada. BetterDwelling reported that there will be a shortage of 60,000 trade worker, along with an estimated 700,000 tradespersons retiring from the field in 2028. Each province and territory assesses trades workers with unique criteria. Additionally, each employer will require on-the-job training and experience, as well. To learn more about getting assessed, you should go to the website of the body that governs trades for the province/territory where you would like to live and work. The process is different, depending on where you want to go. Each website has more details about certificates of qualification to work in that province or territory in a specific skilled trade, and what you have to do to get one. You can get assessed by your location here.

When to use an employment/settlement agency

Immigrants can use Service Provider Organizations (SPOs), which are also commonly referred to as settlement or employment agencies. These agencies are funded by the government and most are free to use. They can offer services such as:

  • Resume writing help and review
  • Language assessment and classes
  • Job search assistance
  • Interview practice

World Education Services (WES) polled whether these employment services helped new immigrants find jobs, and found that 77.3 per cent of survey respondents who used employment services were able to find employment.

Polish your resume for success

Canadian resumes are formatted in a traditional way and employers will want to see concise employment wins rather than a long-winded task list. Skip creating a generic resume and sending it to every job listing you like. Instead, tailor your resume to appeal to each position you apply to. For example, if you have worked in banking and technology, but are applying for an IT position, skip the banking experience unless it is relevant. Alternatively, you can highlight any technical experience you gained in your banking position.

Special bridging programs get you ready for Canada

Bridging programs are educational programs for internationally trained professionals. These programs, which are available through many universities in Canada, allow professionals to continue their education and further their skills to fit Canada’s workforce needs. Newcomers looking to find employment in a field that requires licensing or credentials will find more success if they go through a bridging program. This is because becoming a licensed professional is complicated in any country, and the bridging program helps guide newcomers to receive the training they need to complete the process.

Simply do a web search for, “province + bridging programs” to generate a list of universities and companies that participate. There are bridging programs available for several different professions, from accounting to optometry. For example the Alberta government has a bridging program for Costs vary depending on university and profession, but in many cases, a newcomer can qualify for financial aid for a portion of their program.

Prepare yourself to find a job by getting your credentials recognized if needed

Depending on your profession, you may need to have your past education, certificates, and work experience certified. This process is sometimes necessary because it matches up your education and experience to what is equivalent in Canadian, so that you do not need to start your job search from scratch. Here are the exact steps to get accredited.

Whether you need resources to find a job as a newcomer or financial support to start your new life in Canada, Scotiabank has what you need. We can’t wait to help you on this exciting journey.

Legal Disclaimer: This article is provided for information purposes only. It is not to be relied upon as financial, tax or investment advice or guarantees about the future, nor should it be considered a recommendation to buy or sell. Information contained in this article, including information relating to interest rates, market conditions, tax rules, and other investment factors are subject to change without notice and The Bank of Nova Scotia is not responsible to update this information. References to any third party product or service, opinion or statement, or the use of any trade, firm or corporation name does not constitute endorsement, recommendation, or approval by The Bank of Nova Scotia of any of the products, services or opinions of the third party. All third party sources are believed to be accurate and reliable as of the date of publication and The Bank of Nova Scotia does not guarantee its accuracy or reliability. Readers should consult their own professional advisor for specific financial, investment and/or tax advice tailored to their needs to ensure that individual circumstances are considered properly and action is taken based on the latest available information.

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